Tag Archives: children’s book illustration

behind the scenes of “BABIES AROUND THE WORLD”

28 May

Recently, duopress released Babies Around the World — a 20-page board book written by Puck, designed by Beatriz Juarez, and illustrated by moi, Violet Lemay.

We opted for a collage look for the book, which was a fun departure from my watercolor paintbox. A new iPad Pro gave me my first-ever access to digital brushes. Babies Around the World was my pioneer attempt at creating images without using any traditional media… with a few special exceptions!

Working Digitally

After adding an iPad Pro and Apple pencil to my studio, setting up my new digital workspace was easy. All I had to do was purchase and download two genius, easy-to-use tech products:

  1.  Astropad, an app that converts the iPad Pro into a tablet by reflecting your computer monitor
  2. digital brushes from Kyle T. Webster

Setting everything up was easy. I’ve used Photoshop to adjust and manipulate scans of my paintings for eons, so the only new skill I had to acquire was loading brushes. It took me a little while to get used to Astropad and to decide which of Kyle’s plethora of cool brushes to use, but that is to be expected. Both suppliers—Team Astropad and Kyle T. Webster—were super nice and offered great support. (By the way, besides designing brushes for Photoshop, Kyle is also a terrific illustrator. Check out his portfolio here.)

The Few Special Exceptions to My New Digital Process

My son Graham and I have always used his school breaks as opportunities for mother-son artistic collaborations. His work has made its way into several books I’ve illustrated, including NY Dogs, a gift book that I wrote and illustrated for punchline shortly before acquiring the iPad. Graham contributed a hand-drawn map to NY Dogs, for which he is credited in a splashy way at the end of the book (see previous post).

Here is his drawing, and how I incorporated it into NY Dogs.

Last summer, because of his special interest in architecture, I gave Graham the assignment of drawing various structures from the cities featured in Babies Around the World.

Some are quite famous, like the San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid, but others are more obscure… because Graham appreciates buildings that most of us have never heard of. That’s my boy.

Here are some of the drawings that Graham contributed to Babies Around the World, along with the final images so you can see the end result.

Graham is a traditionalist—his drawings are made with Micron pens on printer paper, which I scanned and collaged into my illustrations.

Because Babies Around the World is a board book with very few pages, all of the fine print—including Graham’s credit—is on the back cover.

The Re-Cap

1) Astropad and Kyle T. Webster’s brushes have revolutionized my illustration process, and are aiding my effort to save the planet. Previously I went through at least a ream of paper every time I illustrated a book—as shown in this photo of my file from NY Dogs. #recommend! Click their names above to be redirected to their websites.

2) Working with Graham is simply the best! As I write this post, my son is fifteen years old. We’ve been collaborating since he was six or seven, and I hope we never stop. All this time he’s been wild about buildings, and has been contributing tech drawings of his favorites at a cool website called skyscraperpage.com. He has posted over 4oo buildings to date—check out his drawings by clicking here! But please don’t tell him that I sent you. No inter-family tagging allowed. 🙂

____________________

BATW 3D cover + globe

*

Click here to order Babies Around the World, written by Puck and illustrated by Violet Lemay (with a little help from her son Graham… who drew the front cover globe!)

published by duopress / distributed by Workman Publishing / 2017

Advertisements

Gray

9 May

thinking I couldn’t let Mother’s Day go by this year without mentioning Gray, my only child, who happens also to be my occasional co-conspirator in the realm of book illustration. This ginger fellow may be taller than me now, but is barely a teenager—he turned thirteen last fall, just a few months after he contributed drawings to one of my latest book endeavors, duopress‘s 100 PABLO PICASSOS. blue period Summarizing the incredible life of Pablo Picasso for a 32-page children’s book would be a difficult task for anyone, but author Mauricio Velázquez de León made it look easy. There are 14 two-page spreads in the book, each devoted to a different topic: Picasso’s Blue Period (above), his Rose Period, the years he spent chumming with the likes of Max Jacob and Henri Matisse in Gertrude Stein’s studio (below), etc. paris The first spread in 100 PABLO PICASSOS is devoted to the artist’s early life—and this is where Gray comes in. hillside sketch Gray is DNY QR codean amazing artist—he made the above sketch, which is such a tiny sample of his overall body of work that it is laughable. In my house, storage tubs filled with thirteen years of this kind of thing are stuck in every closet and under every bed. Because of my son’s particular interest in architecture, duopress contracted then-nine-year-old Gray to doodle some famous Big Apple buildings for the web component of Doodle New York (by Puck/illustrated by Violet Lemay/2012). A handful of QR codes are sprinkled throughout Doodle New York, which are linked to downloadable coloring pages—several of which were drawn (with a blue ball-point pen!) by Gray… whose professional name is Graham Fruisen. The coloring pages are still available, but you can only see them if you buy the book and scan the QR codes. When you do, imagine a skinny, freckled, bespectacled teenager groaning with despair. “That is not my best work!” carrot top As soon as I read Mauricio’s manuscript for 100 PABLO PICASSOS, I knew I would enlist Gray’s help for the “Picasso as a boy” spread. The mom in me was excited because school was out for the summer, and I was looking stuff for Gray to do. I asked him to contribute drawings of donkeys, doves, and bulls—not Gray’s typical genre, but he was willing to dabble. My hope was that my new assistant would just draw them already! As a boy Picasso drew in a classic style, very similar to the way Gray tends to draw—but my son went the extra mile. He researched Picasso and did his best to draw donkeys, doves and bulls as he imagined Picasso (the grown up, world renowned artist) would have drawn them. The result (below) is beautiful, even if it isn’t exactly what I had in mind. But hey, this is what happens when illustrators pay their assistants with Little Debbie Swiss Rolls and blueberry freezes from the corner Quickie Mart. 100PP_boy spread Our resulting collaboration, 100 Pablo Picassos, is newly available everywhere books are sold. Click here to order your copy today! And THANK YOU, Gray! You’ll always be my baby. Mama loves you, boy. baby gray